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One is that such a low-budget film looks so good visually.

In Flower Island, Song showed an unusual talent for the aesthetics of digital cinema, but here he takes it one step further.

To capture a natural setting so well on a medium that often feels cold and sterile is an unusual accomplishment.

The relaxed, convincing performances of the actors also deserve notice.

One hopes that it will be liberated from the other two segments of 1.3.6. At 70 minutes, it is a perfectly respectable length for a stand-alone feature film, and this is a movie that deserves to travel.

(Darcy Paquet) There was a lot going on in the world of Korean film at the beginning of 2005.

Git centers around a film director who, in the middle of starting his next screenplay, remembers a promise he'd made ten years earlier.

While staying on a remote southern island off Jeju-do, he and his girlfriend of the time agreed to come back and meet at the same motel exactly ten years in the future.

(It seems appropriate that Git's basic setup recalls Richard Linklater's Before Sunset, another film that stands out for the beauty and simplicity of its construction) On Biyang-do, the director -- named Jang Hyun-seong, the same as the actor who portrays him -- is overpowered with both memories of the past and the beauty of the island.This may have been what happened with Git by Song Il-gon, the director of Flower Island (2001), Spider Forest (2004), and various award-winning short films including The Picnic (1999).Git was originally commissioned as a 30-minute segment of the digital omnibus film 1.3.6.A peacock appears on the island, with no clear explanation or motivation.And the tango, a very un-Korean pasttime, makes a striking appearance in the film.

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